Ninth Grade World History

 

Course Description:

World Studies from 1750 to the Present:  Age of Revolutions through the 20th Century.

Ninth grade students continue the chronological study of world history.  This study incorporates each of the seven standards.  As students study historic eras, they consider the influence of geographic settings, cultural perspectives, economic systems and various forms of government.  Students gain a deeper understanding of the role of citizens and continue to develop their research skills.

 

History

Students use materials drawn from the diversity of human experience to analyze and interpret significant events, patterns and themes in the history of Ohio, the United States and the world.

 

Benchmark A: Explain connections between the ideas of the Enlightenment and changes in the relationships between citizens and their governments.

 

 

1.

Explain how Enlightenment ideas produced enduring effects on political, economic and cultural institutions, including challenges to religious authority, monarchy and absolutism.

 

 

2.

Explain connects among Enlightenment ideas, the American Revolution, the French Revolution and Latin American wars for independence.

 

       Honors:

 

H-

Explain six major ideas of the Enlightenment and identify the philosophers who originated each.

 

 

H-

Create chronologies of significant events in the Enlightenment, American Revolution, French Revolution and Latin American wars for independence.

 

 

H-

Analyze important documents of the Enlightenment period.

 

 

 

 

 

Benchmark B: Explain the social, political and economic effects of industrialization.

 

 

3.

Explain the causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution with emphasis on:

 

a.

How scientific and technological changes promoted industrialization in the textile industry in England;

 

b.

The impact of the growth of population, rural-to-urban migrations, growth of industrial cities, and emigration out of Europe;

 

c.

The changing role of labor and the rise of the union movement;

 

d.

Changes in living and working conditions for the early industrial working class, especially women and children;

 

e.

The growth of industrialization around the world.

 

       Honors:

 

H-

Identify thinkers and ideas that supported industrialization.

 

 

H-

Explain the origins and main concepts of socialism.

 

 

Benchmark C: Analyze the reasons that countries gained control of territory through imperialism and the impact on people living in the territory that was controlled.

 

 

 

       Honors:

4.

 

 

Describe the political, economic and social roots of imperialism:

 

a.

Identify the forms of imperialism and relevant characteristics.

 

 

5.

Analyze the perspectives of the colonizers and the colonized concerning:

 

a.

Indigenous language;

 

b.

Natural resources;

 

c.

Labor;

 

d.

Political systems;

 

e.

Religion.

 

 

6.

Explain the global impact of imperialism including:

 

a.

Modernization of Japan;

 

b.

Political and social reform in China;

 

c.

Exploitation of African resources.

 

Honors:

 

H-

Examine case studies of imperialism in selected African lands, in India and in Southeast Asia.

 

Benchmark D: Connect developments related to World War I with the onset of World

War II.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       Honors:

7.

Analyze the causes and effects of World War I with emphasis on:

 

a.

Militarism, imperialism, nationalism and alliances;

 

b.

The global scope, outcomes and human costs of the war;

 

c.

The role of new technologies and practices including the use of poison gas, trench warfare, machine guns, airplanes, submarine and tanks;

 

d.

The Treaty of Versailles and the league of Nations;

 

e.

Summarize the events that set World War I in motion;

 

f.

Compare and contrast the progression of the war on the Western and Eastern fronts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       Honors:

8.

Analyze the causes and consequences of the Russian Revolution including:

 

a.

The lack of economic, political and social reforms under the tsars;

 

b.

The impact of World War I;

 

c.

The emergence of Lenin, Stalin and the Bolsheviks;

 

d.

The rise of communism in Russia;

 

e.

Create a chronology of significant events in the Russian Revolution.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       Honors:

9.

Assess the global impact of post-World War I economic, social and political turmoil including:

 

a.

Disarmament;

 

b.

Worldwide depression;

 

c.

Colonial rebellion;

 

d.

Rise of militarist and totalitarian states in Europe and Asia;

 

e.

Identify and explain the new scientific ideas that challenged old beliefs at this time;

 

f.

Summarize new styles in art, architecture, music and technology.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       Honors:

10.

Analyze the causes of World War II including:

 

a.

Appeasement;

 

b.

Axis expansion;

 

c.

The role of the Allies;

 

d.

Research the actions of the major European and Asian aggressors of the 1930’s;

 

e.

Compare the ideologies of Fascism/Nazism and Communism.

 

 

 

 

 

Benchmark E: Analyze connections between World War II, the Cold War and contemporary conflicts.

 

 

11.

Analyze the consequences of World War II including:

 

a.

Atomic weapons;

 

b.

Civilian and military losses;

 

c.

The Holocaust and its impact;

 

d.

Refugees and poverty;

 

e.

The United Nations;

 

f.

The establishment of the state of Israel.

 

 

12.

Analyze the impact of conflicting political and economic ideologies after World War II that resulted in the Cold War including:

 

a.

Soviet expansion in Eastern Europe;

 

b.

The division of Germany;

 

c.

The emergence of NATO and the Warsaw Pact;

 

d.

The Chinese Communist Revolution.

 

 

13.

Examine social, economic and political struggles resulting from colonialism and imperialism including:

 

a.

Independence movements in India, Indochina and Africa;

 

b.

Rise of dictatorships in former colonies.

 

 

14.

Explain the causes and consequences of the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War including:

 

a.

The arms build-up;

 

b.

Ethnic unrest in the Soviet Union;

 

c.

Independence movements in former Soviet Satellites;

 

d.

Global decline of communism.

 

 

 

15.

Examine regional and ethnic conflict in the post-Cold War era including:

 

a.

Persistent conflict in the Middle East;

 

b.

Ethnic strife in Europe, Africa and Asia.

 

Honors:

 

H-

Participate in a debate on an issue relevant to the consequences of World War II.

 

 

H-

Identify the leaders responsible for gaining independence in India, Indochina and Africa, and Eastern Europe.

 

 

H-

Examine archival documents and read literature of the World War II through post-Cold War period.

 

Benchmark F: Identify major historical patterns in the domestic affairs of the United States during the 20th century and explain their significance.

 

 

No indicators present for this benchmark.

 

 

 

People in Societies

Students use knowledge of perspectives, practices and products of cultural, ethnic and social groups to analyze the impact of their commonality and diversity within local, national, regional and global settings.

 

Benchmark A: Analyze the influence of different cultural perspectives on the actions of groups.

 

 

1.

Analyze examples of how people in different cultures view events from different perspectives including:

 

a.

Creation of the state of Israel;

 

b.

Partition of India and Pakistan;

 

c.

Reunification of Germany;

 

d.

End of apartheid in South Africa.

 

Honors:

 

H-

Describe the events that led to the formation of the new nation of Israel.

 

 

H-

List the causes and effects of the Arab-Israeli Wars since 1948.

 

 

H-

Discuss the role of Nelson Mandela in ending apartheid in South Africa.

 

Benchmark B: Analyze the consequences of oppression, discrimination and conflict between cultures.

 

 

2.

Analyze the results of political, economic, and social oppression and the violation of human rights including:

 

a.

The exploitation of indigenous peoples;

 

b.

The Holocaust and other acts of genocide, including those that have occurred in Armenia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Iraq.

 

Honors:

 

H-

Read and discuss selected literature of the Holocaust and other 20th century acts of genocide.

 

Benchmark C: Analyze the ways that contacts between people of different cultures result in exchanges of cultural practices.

 

 

3.

Explain how advances in communication and transportation have impacted:

 

a.

Globalization;

 

b.

Cooperation and conflict;

 

c.

The environment;

 

d.

Collective security;

 

e.

Popular culture;

 

f.

Political systems;

 

g.

Religion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Geography

Students use knowledge of geographic locations, patterns and processes to show the interrelationship between the physical environment and human activity, and to explain the interactions that occur in an increasingly interdependent world.

 

Benchmark A: Analyze the cultural, physical, economic and political characteristics that define regions and describe reasons that regions change over time.

 

 

1.

Interpret data to make comparisons between and among countries and regions including:

 

a.

Birth rates;

 

b.

Death rates;

 

c.

Infant mortality rates;

 

d.

Education levels;

 

e.

Per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

 

 

2.

Explain how differing points of view play a role in conflicts over territory and resources.

 

 

3.

Explain how political and economic conditions, resources, geographic locations and cultures have contributed to cooperation and conflict.

 

Honors:

 

H-

Choose a contemporary conflict in Asia or the Middle East and explain its causes.

 

Benchmark B: Analyze geographic changes brought about by human activity using appropriate maps and other geographic data.

 

 

4.

Explain the causes and consequences of urbanization including economic development, population growth and environmental change.

 

Honors:

 

H-

Identify a map of imperialist Africa in 1913 and compare it to a map of modern Africa.

 

 

H-

Identify the major battle sites in the First and Second World Wars.

 

 

 

H-

Compare maps of Cold War Eastern Europe with those of Europe today.

 

Benchmark C: Analyze the patterns and processes of movement of people, products and ideas.

 

 

5.

Analyze the social, political, economic and environmental factors that have contributed to human migration now and in the past.

 

 

Economics

Students use economic reasoning skills and knowledge of major economic concepts, issues and systems in order to make informed choices as producers, consumers, savers, investors, workers and citizens in an interdependent world.

 

Benchmark A: Compare how different economic systems answer the fundamental economic questions of what goods and services to produce, how to produce them, and who will consume them.

 

 

1.

Describe costs and benefits of trade with regard to:

 

a.

Standard of living;

 

b.

Productive capacity;

 

c.

Usage of productive resources;

 

d.

Infrastructure.

 

 

2.

Explain how changing methods of production and a country’s productive resources affect how it answers the fundamental economic questions of what to produce, how to produce, and for whom to produce.

 

 

3.

Analyze characteristics of traditional, market, command and mixed economies with regard to:

 

a.

Private property;

 

b.

Freedom of enterprise;

 

c.

Competition and consumer choice;

 

d.

The role of government.

 

Benchmark B: Explain how the U.S. government provides public services, redistributes income, regulates economic activity, and promotes economic growth and stability.

 

 

4.

Analyze the economic costs and benefits of protectionism, tariffs, quotas and blockades on international trade.

 

Honors:

 

H-

Analyze the success or failure of Napoleon’s Continental System.

             

 

 

Government

Students use knowledge of the purposes, structures and processes of political systems at the local, state, national and international levels to understand that people create systems of government as structures of power and authority to provide order, maintain stability and promote the general welfare.

 

Benchmark A: Analyze the evolution of the Constitution through post-Reconstruction amendments and Supreme Court decisions.

 

 

No indicators present for this benchmark.

 

Benchmark B: Analyze the differences among various forms of government to determine how power is acquired and used.

 

 

1.

Explain how various systems of governments acquire, use and justify their power.

 

 

2.

Analyze the purposes, structures and functions of various systems of government including:

 

a.

Absolute monarchies;

 

b.

Constitutional monarchies;

 

c.

Parliamentary democracies;

 

d.

Presidential democracies;

 

e.

Dictatorships;

 

f.

Theocracies.

 

 

 

Honors:

 

H-

For each system of government, identify significant monarchs, political leaders, dictators and religious leaders for each century, 1750 to the present.

 

Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

Students use knowledge of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in order to examine and evaluate civic ideals and to participate in community life and the American democratic system.

 

Benchmark A: Analyze ways people achieve governmental change, including political action, social protest and revolution.

 

 

1.

Analyze and evaluate the influence of various forms of citizen action on public policy including:

 

a.

The French Revolution;

 

b.

The international movement to abolish the slave trade and slavery;

 

c.

The Russian Revolution;

 

d.

The independence movement in India;

 

e.

The fall of communism in Europe;

 

f.

The end of apartheid.

 

 

2.

Describe and compare opportunities for citizen participation under different systems of government including:

 

a.

Absolute monarchies;

 

b.

Constitutional monarchies;

 

c.

Parliamentary democracies;

 

d.

Presidential democracies;

 

e.

Dictatorships;

 

f.

Theocracies.

 

 

3.

Analyze how governments and other groups have used propaganda to influence public opinion and behavior.

 

Honors:

 

H-

Discuss how the war on terrorism has affected policies of the major world nations.

 

 

H-

Explain how the League of Nations, the United Nations and international peacekeeping forces illustrate the international commitment to collective security.

 

Benchmark B: Explain how individual rights are relative, not absolute, and describe the balance between individual rights, the rights of others, and the common good.

 

 

No indicators present for this benchmark.

 

 

Social Studies Skills and Methods

Students collect, organize, evaluate and synthesize information from multiple sources to draw logical conclusions.  Students communicate this information using appropriate social studies terminology in oral, written or multimedia form and apply what they have learned to societal issues in simulated or real-world settings.

 

Benchmark A: Evaluate the reliability and credibility of sources.

 

 

1.

Detect bias and propaganda in primary and secondary sources of information.

 

 

2.

Evaluate the credibility of sources for:

 

a.

Logical fallacies;

 

b.

Consistency of arguments;

 

c.

Unstated assumptions;

 

d.

Bias.

 

 

3.

Analyze the reliability of sources for:

 

a.

Accurate use of facts;

 

b.

Adequate support of statements;

 

c.

Date of publication.

 

 

 

Honors:

 

H-

View and prepare a report on the content of a historical film and evaluate its historical validity.

 

Benchmark B: Use data and evidence to support or refute a thesis.

 

 

4.

Develop and present a research project including:

 

a.

Collection of data;

 

b.

Narrowing and refining the topic;

 

c.

Construction and support of the thesis.

 

Honors:

 

H-

Design and present to the class, a technology-based presentation on an 18th or 19th century topic.

 

 

H-

Complete a lengthy research paper on a 20th century World History topic that is approved by the instructor.

 

 

 

Technology Standard I

The student as an information navigator.

 

Benchmark A: Information acquisition - use online and electronic resources to communicate, collaborate and retrieve information.

 

 

1.

Use the Internet and other electronic resources for research and digital media retrieval.

 

 

2.

Use electronics to communicate and collaborate with others (e.g., communicate with outside groups, classes and experts via e-mail and the Internet).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Technology Standard II

The student as a critical thinker and analyzer using technology.

 

Benchmark A: Source verification – research and evaluate the accuracy, relevance, appropriateness, comprehensiveness and bias of electronic information sources concerning real-world problems.

 

 

1.

Evaluate and critique the quality and credibility of electronic information.

 

 

Technology Standard III

The student as a creator of knowledge using technology, media and telecommunications.

 

Benchmark A: Input and output devices - use input and output devices to successfully use modern technologies.

 

 

1.

Use a variety of input and output devices to successfully use modern technologies.

 

Benchmark B: Productivity tools - use a variety of technology resources and applications to remediate skill deficits, facilitate learning throughout the curriculum.

 

 

2.

Use word processing applications.

 

 

3.

Use spreadsheet applications.

 

 

4.

Use draw and paint applications.

 

 

5.

Integrate two or more applications.

 

 

6.

Use electronic resources to practice skills and remediate deficits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Technology Standard IV

The student as en effective communicator through a variety of appropriate technologies/media.

 

Benchmark A: Publishing - design, develop, publish and present multimedia and online products using technology resources that demonstrate and communicate curriculum concepts to audiences inside and outside of the classroom.

 

 

1.

Create multimedia and/or online projects.

 

 

2.

Present multimedia and/or online projects to audiences inside and outside the classroom.

 

 

3.

Print, post, publish and/or distribute technology products.

 

 

 

Technology Standard V

The student as a discriminating selector of appropriate technology for specific purposes.

 

Benchmark A: Tool selection and use – determine when technology is useful and select the appropriate tool(s) and technology resources to address a variety of tasks and problems.

 

 

1.

Make appropriate technology resource choices according to learning purposes and outcomes.

 

 

Technology Standard VI

The student as a technician.

 

Benchmark A: Terminology and usage - understand and communicate, using terminology, common uses of technology in daily life and the advantages and disadvantages those uses provide.

 

 

1.

Demonstrate an understanding of terminology related to technology.

 

Benchmark B: Basic operations and networking - understand and effectively utilize a networked computer system.

 

 

2.

Access, print, save and retrieve resources using the network.

 

 

 

3.

Use basic operating system features (e.g., help menus and control panels).

 

Benchmark C: Troubleshooting – apply strategies for identifying and solving routine hardware and software problems.

 

 

4.

Employ basic technology troubleshooting and maintenance techniques.

 

 

 

 

Technology Standard VII

The student as a responsible citizen, worker, learner, community member and family member in a technology age.

 

Benchmark A: Ethics - advocate and apply positive social and ethical behaviors when using technology and identify the consequences of misuse.

 

 

1.

Understand and apply the basic workings of the copyright law and appropriate usage of materials, including citing resources.

 

 

2.

Demonstrate appropriate behavior for technology use and show respect for technology.

 

 

3.

Apply and advocate the Westlake School District Acceptable Use Policy (AUP).

 

Benchmark B: Adapting to changes in technology – demonstrate knowledge of and make informed decisions about technology, system resources and services.  Assess the advantages and disadvantages of these systems in the workplace and in society as a whole.

 

 

1.

Understand the relationship that technology has to career opportunities, history and to today’s society and world.

 


Grade Nine – World Studies 1750 to the Present

Note:  These important terms are contained in the grade nine Grade Level Indicators.

History

People in Societies

Geography

Economics

Government

Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

Study Skills and Methods

absolutism

alliances

Allies

appeasement

atomic weapons

Axis

Bolsheviks

civilian

Cold War

colonialism

colonized

communism

cultural

   institutions

depression

dictatorships

disarmament

economic

   institutions

emigration

Enlightenment

ethnic unrest/

   conflict/strife

exploitation

Holocaust

ideologies

imperialism (roots

   of)

apartheid

collective security

communication

cooperation v.

   conflict

exploitation

genocide

globalization

indigenous

   people

oppression/

   violation of

   human rights

partition

perspectives

popular culture

reunification

transportation

 

human migration

infant mortality

per capita/Gross

   Domestic Product-

   GDP

urbanization

 

blockades

command economy

competition

freedom of

   enterprise

infrastructure (of

   trade)

international trade

market economy

mixed economies

private property

productive capacity

protectionism

quotas

standard of living

tariffs

traditional economy

 

absolute

   monarchies

constitutional

   monarchies

dictatorships

parliamentary

   democracies

presidential

   democracies

theocracies

 

abolish slavery/trade

citizen action

influence

international movement

propaganda

public policy/opinion

slavery

 

assumptions

bias

consistency

credibility of sources

logical fallacies

primary/secondary

   sources

propaganda

thesis

 

Note:  This presentation of Standards-Based vocabulary is based on the model established by the Summit County Educational Service Center.

Teachers are expected to reinforce terminology introduced at previous grade levels.

 

History

People in Societies

Geography

Economics

Government

Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

Study Skills and Methods

(continued)

indigenous language

Industrial

   Revolution

industrialization

labor

militarism/militarist/

   military

modernization

monarchy

nationalism

natural resources

persistent conflict

perspectives

political institutions

poverty

reform (political &

   social)

refugees

revolution

rural-to-urban

   migrations

satellites

social institutions

Soviet

technologies

textile

totalitarian

trench warfare

tsars

union movement

working class

working conditions